For industry veteran Stephen Arnold, raffling off guitars is his way of sharing his love for them while connecting with entertainment marketing professionals from around the world.

“Everybody can relate to a guitar somehow, even if they’re not a guitar player,” Arnold said.

Stephen Arnold Music will make its return to the 2019 Promax Conference and Promax Station Summit for its annual guitar giveaway. This year’s raffle, dubbed the “Grunge Guitar Giveaway,” will feature unique replicas of guitars popularized during the ‘90s grunge movement, including those played by Sonic Youth and Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain.

“It’s great because guitars are something that I love and something that have been associated with our brand,” Arnold said. “It’s a great feeling to see the look on [winners’] faces when you call their name.”

Stephen Arnold Music kiosks will be prominently displayed throughout both conferences, allowing attendees to enter by dropping off their business card. Arnold will give away one guitar during the 2019 Promax Conference and four during Promax Station Summit. Special guitars from his personal collection will also be on display.

The 2019 Promax Conference

1960’s Fender Jazzmaster Replica (Giveaway Guitar):



Introduced in 1958, following the success of the Telecaster & Stratocaster models, the Jazzmaster was targeted at jazz players with its warm tone, unusual switching features and “offset waist” body, which made it more comfortable for “jazzers” to sit while playing. But instead of jazz, it became a favorite in the ‘60s surf guitar scene. This model faded in the hard rock ’70s, but re-appeared in the ‘90s Seattle grunge movement when played by Sonic Youth and Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain (see above). This Jazzmaster has been upgraded with original Jazzmaster pickups from the ‘60s.

1965 Fender Mustang (Display Only):

This particular 1965 Fender Mustang, from Stephen Arnold’s personal collection, was his first “real” rock guitar in the late ‘60s. Originally designed as a notch down from the Telecaster and Stratocaster models, the Mustang evolved from the student series Fender Duosonic and Musicmaster guitars of the ‘50s. Featuring twin pickups, they were entry level guitars for many budding rockers in the ‘60s and ‘70s. They really took off, however, when Cobain and Mark Arm of Mudhoney started using them in the ‘90s Seattle grunge scene. Today, they are prized symbols of the birth of rock ‘n’ roll.

1960 Fender Jazzmaster (Display Only):

This mint green, 1960s Fender Jazzmaster is from Stephen Arnold’s personal collection, and proudly displays the vintage patina it has earned over time. It has never been modified, as opposed to most of the Jazzmasters that were pressed into service in the punk/new wave and grunge/alternative scenes of the ‘80s and ‘90s. Many of them were completely rewired, had custom pickups and necks, etc. fitted to suit the individual player. of Television and most famously, Elvis Costello, favored these classic guitars for their full, dirty sound. Originally designed as a jazz instrument, they first found popularity in the ‘60s surf guitar scene.

1970s Univox Hi-Flier (Display Only):

This relatively obscure Hi-Flier model is from Stephen Arnold’s personal collection. It was designed to copy Mosrite guitars, favored by the surf group The Ventures, and is instantly recognizable by its tilted neck pickup. After many mods through the ‘70s, the guitar went out of production in the early ‘80s, but was revived in the ‘90s grunge rock scene in Seattle. Since these weren’t expensive instruments, Kurt Cobain of Nirvana used to sometimes destroy them at the end of a gig. The nicks and chips on this particular guitar (we think they’re cool) are worn with pride!

Promax Station Summit

1960s Kurt Cobain Fender Mustang Replica (Giveaway Guitar):

Originally designed as a notch down from the Telecaster and Stratocaster models, the Mustang evolved from the student series Fender Duosonic and Musicmaster guitars of the ‘50s. Featuring twin pickups, they were entry level guitars for many budding rockers in the ‘60s and ‘70s (a 1965 Fender Mustang was Stephen Arnold’s first “real” rock guitar in the late ‘60s). They really took off; however, when Kurt Cobain of Nirvana and Mark Arm of Mudhoney started using them in the Seattle grunge scene of the ‘90s. Today, they are prized symbols of the birth of rock ‘n’ roll.

1960s Fender Jazzmaster Replica (Giveaway Guitar):

Introduced in 1958, following the success of the Telecaster & Stratocaster models, the Jazzmaster was targeted at jazz players with its warmer tone, unusual switching features and its “offset waist” body, which made it more comfortable for jazzers to sit while playing. But instead of jazz, it became a favorite in the 60s surf guitar scene. This model faded in the hard rock ‘70s, but re-appeared in the ‘90s Seattle grunge movement, and was played by Kurt Cobain of Nirvana and the band Sonic Youth. Many of these guitars were completely rewired or had custom pickups, necks, etc.

1960s Fender Jaguar Replica (Giveaway Guitar):

Named after the infamous Jaguar E-type sports car, the Jaguar was introduced in 1962 by maker Leo Fender as Fender’s top-of-the-line model, and the last he ever designed before he sold the company to CBS. Its popularity, however, was dampened by the Gretsches & Rickenbackers of the ‘60s British invasion, then by the Gibsons, Strats and Telecasters of the hard-rock ‘70s. It was discontinued in 1975 but revived when Cobain and others started cranking out grunge rock in the ‘90s.

1970s Univox Hi-Flier (Giveaway Guitar):

This vintage, 1970s Hi-Flier model is from Stephen Arnold’s personal collection. It was designed to copy Mosrite guitars, favored by the surf group The Ventures and is instantly recognizable by its tilted neck pickup. After many mods through the ‘70s, the guitar went out of production in the early ‘80s, but was revived in the ‘90s grunge rock scene in Seattle. Since these weren’t expensive instruments, Cobain would sometimes destroy them at the end of a gig. The nicks and chips on this particular guitar are worn with pride.

Tags: conference 2019 station summit 2019 stephen arnold music


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